Simplifying Change

“Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.” ~ Leo Tolstoy

Another personal preference disclosed: I am a big fan of simplicity. I’ll opt for an easy versus a complex solution any time. It’s interesting to observe people who choose difficult paths when easier one’s exist, if not abound. They become easily frustrated.

To me, it seems the easier you make things the better the results you get. This is especially true when it comes to change. When you make changes easier, the change is simpler, clearer and better managed. Unfortunately, society tells us that anything worth having has to be hard, complicated, and require sacrifices of time and energy. I consider this to be a myth. The opposite is true. Anything worth having is attainable by making it easier.

Defined, change is the desired transformation of a feeling, experience, or interaction. It is not a process, thing, or achievement. The transformation begins when clarity is obtained about what is desired.

Here are four strategies that make the transformation and what is desired more easily possible:

  1. Adopt a new view. See that what you want is not only possible but deserved by you (it is). When you think about it, talk about, and make choices for it, always keep the focus on the new feeling, experience, and interaction.
  2. Give up being a victim. If you believe things are happening to you or people are preventing you from having what you desire, you fail to see the range of possible choices you have, especially the ones different than the ones you have been choosing. Blaming and complaining only delay transformation, they cannot create it.
  3. See barriers as opportunities. Difficulty and especially frustration in getting what you want, is an opportunity to choose a new path, find a different way, or use a different resource. The message is basically, “not this way.” Accept and look for a different way.
  4. Take responsibility. What you desire can be yours, in time and when the situation is ready. When you take responsibility for your focus, choices, and especially your thoughts and feelings, you can be confident that at the right time and place you will have what you want. Let your desires flow toward you and change will occur with little effort or concerted action on your part.

Whatever you want more or less of in your life begins the process of change. Even with subtle shifts. You only have to make it easier by changing your view of it, giving up victimization, dispelling the “I can’t belief,” clearly seeing opportunities, and taking responsibility. As easy as it sounds, it is just that easy to do, because you choose to make it easier.

A simple yet poignant mantra for your consideration: “Let it be easy.”

12 thoughts on “Simplifying Change

    • It’s so much easier to drift downstream or float with the tide than to row against the current. Being in flow is natural, less stressful and ultimately, productive. I agree with you and appreciate your thought.

  1. H.G. Wells said, “The path of least resistance is the path of the loser.” Many agree with Wells. I do not.

    When we take the path of least resistance, we walk around boulders, rather than trying to chisel away at them. Instead of wasting time and energy to accomplish impossible feats, we skip down the path of least resistance, kicking the pebbles we encounter to the side of the road. Here’s to enjoying the journey . . . along the path of least resistance.

  2. Pingback: Simplifying Change | iBourgie

  3. You have very clear writing… thankyou for being an example of simplicity, ease and clarity… Thank you to for looking at my blog and joining my friendship… let us enjoy each others journey… Barbara

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